Digital Case

The Death Penalty and the Constitution (Video)

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Attribute NameValues
Contributor
Description
  • Capital punishment involves a fundamental public policy that, far more than most, is shaped by how the courts interpret the U.S. Constitution. As an issue, it highlights disputed principles of constitutional interpretation. It also poses starkly the question of how conflicting values of "justice" are or are not relevant to the work of interpreting the law. On September 17, the Case Western Reserve University School of Law has invited Sister Helen Prejean to give the Frank J. Battisti Memorial Lecture. Sister Helen is a well-known opponent of the death penalty, as portrayed by Susan Sarandon in the film, Dead Man Walking. In order to provide a more extensive investigation of what this issue tells us about the Constitution in American life, the Center for Policy Studies has invited three members of our faculty for a panel discussion, based on their varied experience as a death penalty litigator, constitutional lawyer, and ethicist, and to respond to a series of questions from a student panel. The panel for this discussion includes Mike Benza, Jon Entin and Shannon French. Event held on September 17, 2009 in the Thwing Center, 1914 Lounge, Case Western Reserve University.
Subject
Date
  • 2009-09-17
Publisher
Source
  • Center for Policy Studies, Case Western Reserve University
Language
  • English
Type
  • Video
Format
  • video/mpeg
PID
  • ksl:bendea00
Identifier ksl:bendea00, http://hdl.handle.net/2186/ksl:bendea00
HANDLE http://hdl.handle.net/2186/ksl:bendea00
Access Rights Open Access
RIS Citation

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Center for Policy Studies