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Anatomy (Image)

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  • Caption: "In the year 1540, at the age of twenty-five, Andreas Vesalius, the founder of modern anatomy, planned this work on anatomy, generally known as the <i>Fabrica</i> from the title <i>De Humani Corporis</i>. This title was given this study because Vesalius considered "the human body a perfect fabric conceived by the creator and achieved by the supreme artist, Nature." "Here are collected," states Dr. Arturo Castiglioni, "the experiences of a teacher who understands the necessity of performing dissections accurately, not according to classical books, but according to critical observations and individual findings." Vesalius, the gallant fighter, courageously attacked the scholastic doctrines from the time of Galen to his own teacher, Sylvius. After this book was issued, a physician no longer had to be a philosopher, able to discuss health and disease in syllogistic form and with the help of classic quotations. Vesalius, enlisted the service of Titian's brilliant pupil Stephen van Calcar, also an ardent anatomist. Calcar's illustrations are the finest that have appeared in any medical book and have only been excelled by the anatomical drawings od Leonardo da Vinci. The delightful woodcuts initials, with the animated putti, in a subtle way supplement the anatomic plates. These initials are also supposed to have been designed by the celebrated Calcar. The printer Johannes Oporinus, who assumed this Latin name from the German "Herbst," was one of the most brilliant scholars of his time. His folio editions of the <i>Fabrica</i>, (the first issued in 1543, and this second edition in 1555); are master pieces of printing. The second edition, printed in a larger font of Garamond type, with added illustrations, is considered as finer issue of "one of the greatest book of Renaissance" for the text as well as format."
Subject
Date
  • 1555
Publisher
Source
  • Printed by Johannes Oporinus, Basle, 1555
Language
  • Latin
Type
  • Text
  • manuscript leaf
Format
  • image/tiff
  • 27.3 x 39.1 cm
PID
  • ksl:egeboo20
Identifier http://hdl.handle.net/2186/ksl:egeboo20
HANDLE http://hdl.handle.net/2186/ksl:egeboo20
Access Rights Open Access
RIS Citation

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Original Leaves from Famous Books